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Mother-daughter team traverses entire length of Coast Mountains on skis

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Epic Journey

Martina Halik and her mother Tania have just completed a cross-country ski trip from Squamish to Skagway, Alaska, traversing the entire length of the Coast Mountains.

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ChrisDL
16 hours ago
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New York
dreadhead
5 days ago
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Vancouver Island, Canada
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Understanding Privacy Developments with the Latest Browsers

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Solid summary of privacy-related developments in Safari and Chrome via the EFF:

Starting sometime in 2018, Google’s Chrome browser will begin blocking all ads on websites that do not follow new recommendations laid down by the industry group the Coalition for Better Ads (CBA). Chrome will implement this standard, known as the Better Ads Standard, and ban formats widely regarded as obnoxious such as pop-ups, autoplay videos with audio, and interstitial ads that obscure the whole page. Google and its partners worry that these formats are alienating users and driving the adoption of ad blockers. While we welcome the willingness to tackle annoying ads, the CBA’s criteria do not address a key reason many of us install ad blockers: to protect ourselves against the non-consensual tracking and surveillance that permeates the advertising ecosystem operated by the members of the CBA.

Google’s approach contrasts starkly with Apple’s. Apple’s browser, Safari, will use a method called intelligent tracking prevention to prevent tracking by third parties—that is, sites that are rarely visited intentionally but are incorporated on many other sites for advertising purposes—that use cookies and other techniques to track us as we move through the web. Safari will use machine learning in the browser (which means the data never leaves your computer) to learn which cookies represent a tracking threat and disarm them. This approach is similar to that used in EFF’s Privacy Badger, and we are excited to see it in Safari.

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ChrisDL
1 day ago
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New York
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Client asking us for free features

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/* by The coding love */

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ChrisDL
5 days ago
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New York
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Uber finally caves and adds a tipping option to its app

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Do you tip your Uber driver? Uber has always prided itself on being a cashless experience, arguing since its inception that driver tips are only optional — and maybe even unnecessary. Even as its main rival Lyft bragged about the millions of dollars its drivers were collecting in tips, Uber stood steadfast against a growing number of drivers clamoring for tips. Until today.

The embattled ride-hail company announced Tuesday that tipping was finally coming to the Uber app. Starting today, tipping will be available in three cities: Seattle, Minneapolis, and Houston. After the company’s product team works out all the kinks, the option will be rolled out nationwide by the end of July.

So how will it work? Drivers who want to receive tips...

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ChrisDL
6 days ago
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Ugh, tipping is (imo) one of the worst parts of being in the US.
New York
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Security too expensive? Try a hack

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ChrisDL
8 days ago
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New York
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Sweden’s Museum of Failures pays homage to products that flopped

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Anyone remember the marketing catastrophe that was Bic for Her? Or what about the Ford Edsel, which lost so much money that the name “Edsel” became synonymous with failure? These are among the gems featured at Sweden’s newly-opened Museum of Failures, a shrine for mankind’s most spectacular product flops.

Curated by 43-year-old clinical psychologist Samuel West, the museum sits in the Swedish city of Helsingborg where it displays 51 products that were meant to innovate, but failed to do so.

While it’s easy to cluck at terrible products like the $200 TwitterPeek (a device which could only access Twitter), West’s intention with the museum is purely altruistic. “We know that 80 to 90 percent of innovation projects, they fail and you never...

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ChrisDL
9 days ago
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Darn, I'm in sweden but this is a bit too far away.
New York
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